Coverart for item
The Resource For the glory : Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr, Duncan Hamilton

For the glory : Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr, Duncan Hamilton

Label
For the glory : Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr
Title
For the glory
Title remainder
Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr
Statement of responsibility
Duncan Hamilton
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Biography type
individual biography
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1958-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hamilton, Duncan
Dewey number
  • 796.42092
  • B
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
  • photographs
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Liddell, Eric
  • Runners (Sports)
  • Missionaries
  • Missionaries
Label
For the glory : Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr, Duncan Hamilton
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Many people will remember Eric Liddell as the Olympic gold medalist from the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Famously, Liddell would not run on Sunday because of his strict observance of the Christian sabbath, and so he did not compete in his signature event, the 100 meters, at the 1924 Paris Olympics. He was the greatest sprinter in the world at the time, and his choice not to run was ridiculed by the British Olympic committee, his fellow athletes, and most of the world press. Yet Liddell triumphed in a new event, winning the 400 meters in Paris. Liddell ran--and lived--for the glory of his God. After winning gold, he dedicated himself to missionary work. He travelled to China to work in a local school and as a missionary. He married and had children there. By the time he could see war on the horizon, Liddell put Florence, his pregnant wife, and children on a boat to Canada, while he stayed behind, his conscience compelling him to stay among the Chinese. He and thousands of other westerners were eventually interned at a Japanese work camp. Once imprisoned, Liddell did what he was born to do, practice his faith and his sport. He became the moral center of an unbearable world. He was the hardest worker in the camp, he counseled many of the other prisoners, he gave up his own meager portion of meals many days, and he organized games for the children there. He even raced again. For his ailing, malnourished body, it was all too much. Liddell died of a brain tumor just before the end of the war. His passing was mourned around the world, and his story still inspires
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-376) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Prologue: The last race of the champion; Part one: Faster. How to become a great athlete ; A cup of strong tea, please ; Coming to the crossroads ; I wonder if I'm doing the right thing? ; Dancing the tango along the Champs-Élysées ; Not for sale at any price Part two: Higher. Good-bye to all that ; There are no foreign lands ; "Will ye no come back again?" ; There's something I want to talk to you about ; Everywhere the crows are black ; The sharpest edge of the sword Part three: Stronger. The man who isn't there ; No more happy birthdays ; You can run ... but you won't catch us, old man ; Call to me all my sad captains -- Epilogue: What will survive of us is love
Control code
sky279743213
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
388 pages
Isbn
9781594206207
Lccn
bl2016012915
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, map, photographs
Label
For the glory : Eric Liddell's journey from Olympic champion to modern martyr, Duncan Hamilton
Publication
Copyright
Note
Many people will remember Eric Liddell as the Olympic gold medalist from the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Famously, Liddell would not run on Sunday because of his strict observance of the Christian sabbath, and so he did not compete in his signature event, the 100 meters, at the 1924 Paris Olympics. He was the greatest sprinter in the world at the time, and his choice not to run was ridiculed by the British Olympic committee, his fellow athletes, and most of the world press. Yet Liddell triumphed in a new event, winning the 400 meters in Paris. Liddell ran--and lived--for the glory of his God. After winning gold, he dedicated himself to missionary work. He travelled to China to work in a local school and as a missionary. He married and had children there. By the time he could see war on the horizon, Liddell put Florence, his pregnant wife, and children on a boat to Canada, while he stayed behind, his conscience compelling him to stay among the Chinese. He and thousands of other westerners were eventually interned at a Japanese work camp. Once imprisoned, Liddell did what he was born to do, practice his faith and his sport. He became the moral center of an unbearable world. He was the hardest worker in the camp, he counseled many of the other prisoners, he gave up his own meager portion of meals many days, and he organized games for the children there. He even raced again. For his ailing, malnourished body, it was all too much. Liddell died of a brain tumor just before the end of the war. His passing was mourned around the world, and his story still inspires
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-376) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Prologue: The last race of the champion; Part one: Faster. How to become a great athlete ; A cup of strong tea, please ; Coming to the crossroads ; I wonder if I'm doing the right thing? ; Dancing the tango along the Champs-Élysées ; Not for sale at any price Part two: Higher. Good-bye to all that ; There are no foreign lands ; "Will ye no come back again?" ; There's something I want to talk to you about ; Everywhere the crows are black ; The sharpest edge of the sword Part three: Stronger. The man who isn't there ; No more happy birthdays ; You can run ... but you won't catch us, old man ; Call to me all my sad captains -- Epilogue: What will survive of us is love
Control code
sky279743213
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
388 pages
Isbn
9781594206207
Lccn
bl2016012915
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, map, photographs

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